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Understanding and addressing the unmet need in Urology: Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity (NDO)

Prevalence of NDO

Spinal lesions caused by trauma, such as spinal cord injury, or by a progressive neurological condition, such as multiple sclerosis can lead to NDO.


NDO is a complex, multi-symptom syndrome that can be difficult to treat, requiring appropriate effective management - including treatment or referrals to improve patient outcomes

The aetiology of NDO9,10

Aetiologies

  • Spinal cord injury
  • Spina bifida
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Stroke
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Cerebrovascular accidents
  • Other

Common bladder storage symptoms and definitions10,11


Consequences of untreated NDO12-14

Adapted from Tubaro, 2004.12


NDO is a complex, multi-symptom syndrome that can be difficult to treat, requiring appropriate effective management - including treatment or referrals to improve patient outcomes

MS, multiple sclerosis; NDO, neurogenic detrusor overactivity; QoL: quality of life; SCI, spinal cord injury.

BOTOX® is indicated for the management of bladder dysfunctions in adult patients who are not adequately managed with anticholinergics: neurogenic detrusor overactivity with urinary incontinence due to subcervical spinal cord  injury (traumatic or non-traumatic), or multiple sclerosis.15

 

References

  1. Allergan. Data on file. INT/0423/2016
  2. Aurora S K, Winner P et al. OnabotulinumtoxinA for treatment of chronic migraine: pooled analyses of the 56-week PREEMPT clinical program. Headache 2011;51(9):1358-1373
  3. Blumenfeld A M, Stark R J et al. Long-term study of the efficacy and safety of OnabotulinumtoxinA for the prevention of chronic migraine: COMPEL study. J Headache Pain 2018;19(1):13
  4. Allergan. Data on file. 014
  5. Aspire News. Spinal cord injury. Available from: https://www.aspire.org.uk/. Accessed April 2022
  6. Ginsberg D. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of neurogenic bladder. Am J Manag Care 2013;19:S191-S196
  7. Litwiller S E, Frohman E M and Zimmern P E. Multiple sclerosis and the urologist. J Urol 1999;161:743–757
  8. MS Society. MS Prevalence Report January 2020. Available at: https://www.mssociety.org.uk/. Accessed April 2022
  9. Abrams P et al. Incontinence: 6th Edition 2017;50
  10. European Association of Urology Guidelines on Neuro-Urology. 2019. Available at: https://uroweb.org/. Accessed April 2022
  11. Castro Diaz D, Robinson D et al. Patient-reported Outcome Assessment. Abrams P et al. Incontinence: 6th Edition. 2017:50
  12. Tubaro A. Defining overactive bladder: epidemiology and burden of disease. Urology 2004;64(suppl 6A);2–6
  13. de Seze M, Ruffion A et al. The neurogenic bladder in multiple sclerosis: review of the literature and proposal of management guidelines. Multiple Sclerosis 2007;13:915–928
  14. Goldmark E, Niver B and Ginsberg D A. Neurogenic bladder: from diagnosis to management. Curr Urol Rep 2014;15:448
  15. BOTOX® Summary of Product Characteristics. Available at: www.medicines.org.uk. Accessed April 2022

Please refer to the BOTOX® Summary of Product Characteristics for further information on adverse events, contraindications and special warnings and precautions for use.

 

Adverse events should be reported. Reporting forms and information can be found at https://yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk/

Adverse events should also be reported to AbbVie on GBPV@abbvie.com 

 

Date of preparation: April 2022. UK-BUO-220020.